Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory

Founders - Bylaws - Fellows

Founders

The Society was founded in 1990 by Charalambos D. Aliprantis, Edward C. Prescott, and Nicholas C. Yannelis.

Bylaws

Purpose:

The Society exists to advance the theoretical foundations of economics and to facilitate communication among researchers in fields and methods that will enhance the development of economic theory.

Membership:

Any individual with interests in economics based on rigorous theoretical reasoning can become a member provided that he/she pays the dues.

Executive Committee:

The executive committee is made up of the Vice-President, the President, the Past-President, the Secretary, the Treasurer/Editor and any At-Large Members. The current committee is made up of:

  • David Levine (President)
  • Aloisio Araujo (Vice President)
  • Charles Plott (Past President)
  • Edward Prescott (Member at Large)
  • Bernard Cornet (Secretary)
  • Nicholas Yannelis (Treasurer/Editor)

The Secretary and Treasurer/Editor serve six year renewable terms. The Vice-President serves for two years, then two years as President, then two years as Past President. Members-at-Large serve two year terms that may be renewed. The President serves as Chairman of the Executive Committee.

The Executive Committee is responsible for the daily administration of the Society. Two members of the Executive Committee shall represent the Society in external affairs.

All powers of the Society reside with the Executive Committee, including the power to change these by-laws, to amend these by-laws, to change the membership on the Committee, and to conduct business for the Society directly or through delegation. Any member of the Executive Committee can propose matters to be considered or decided by the Executive Committee by mail or email to the members of the committee. Following a proposal members of the Executive committee will submit votes by email to the Secretary who is charged with counting the votes. The vote shall be deemed complete following the submission of votes by all Executive Committee members or three weeks following the proposal, which ever comes first. Any proposal that receives 2/3rds or more of those voting is deemed to have passed.

The Vice-President, Members-At-Large of the Executive Committee and renewal of appointments to the Executive Committee are determined by the Executive Committee under the standard election rules of that Committee. Terms are effective at the beginning of the Annual Meeting of the Society.

The Council:

Past members of the Executive Committee and all the members of the editorial Board of Economic Theory will constitute the council. The role of the council is advisory.

Economic Theory Fellows:

Economic Theory Fellows are selected for their scientific excellence, originality, and leadership; high ethical standards; and scholarly and creative achievement. The contributions of fellows may exist in many areas of theoretical economics, including pure and applied research, and government service. The primary qualification for fellowship is to have substantially advanced economic theory. This achievement may be evidenced by an outstanding publication record; strong editorial board service; honorary, scientific, educational and professional achievements, or through the training of graduate students.

The Fellowship Committee and Nominating Subcommittee:

The Fellowship Committee is a standing committee of the Society. It consists of the Executive Committee and the Nominating Subcommittee. Nominations for Economic Theory Fellows may be made either by any individual Fellow or by recommendation of the Nominating Subcommittee. The sponsors shall provide such information as is required for election to Fellowship. To confirm a nomination of a new Fellow requires 2/3rds of the votes cast by the Fellowship Committee.

The Nominating Subcommittee shall consist of a minimum of six (6) Fellows. At least three (3) members – or more if directed by the Executive Committee - shall be elected by the Fellows. Elections shall be held annually under the direction of the Executive Committee and any Fellow may nominate any other Fellow for membership in the Nominating Subcommittee. The Secretary will organize the voting according to the posted rules. At least three (3) members of the Nominating Committee shall be appointed by the Executive Committee using its ordinary procedures.

Members of the Nominating Subcommittee serve two year terms. One member of the Nominating Subcommittee in the second year of service shall be appointed by the Executive Committee as Chair, and will serve both as Chair of the Nominating Subcommittee and of the entire Fellowship Committee.

Should a member of the Committee on Elections resign prior to completing a full term, the Executive Committee will appoint a replacement committee member to complete the term of the individual who has resigned.

Meetings:

Meetings may take place annually and shall be held at time and place to be designated by the Executive Committee.

Dissolution:

The Society may be dissolved only at a special meeting called for the purpose, and in the manner prescribed by the relevant state laws, by vote of two-thirds of the members of the Executive Committee. Subject to compliance with the applicable provisions of such laws, upon any such dissolution of the Society, all its property remaining after satisfaction of all its obligations shall be distributed to its members.

Economic Theory Fellows

Economic Theory Fellows are selected for their scientific excellence, originality, and leadership; high ethical standards; and scholarly and creative achievement. The contributions of fellows may exist in many areas of theoretical economics, including pure and applied research, and government service. The primary qualification for fellowship is to have substantially advanced economic theory. This achievement may be evidenced by an outstanding publication record; strong editorial board service; honorary, scientific, educational and professional achievements, or through the training of graduate students

  • Nabil Al-Najjar; Northwestern University
  • Beth  Allen; University of Minnesota
  • Rabah  Amir; University of Arizona
  • James Andreoni; University of California, San Diego
  • Aloisio Araujo; Foundation Getulio Vargas and IMPA, Rio de Janeiro
  • Kenneth Arrow; Stanford University
  • Robert J.  Aumann; The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  • David  Austen-Smith; Northwestern University
  • Salvador Barberà; Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
  • Peter  Bardsley; The University of Melbourne
  • Elchanan Ben-Porath; The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  • Ted  Bergstrom; University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Truman  Bewley; Yale University
  • Bruno  Bias; Toulouse School of Economics
  • Sushil  Bikhchandani; University of California, Los Angeles
  • Michele  Boldrin; Washington University in St. Louis
  • Patrick Bolton; Columbia University
  • Jean-Marc  Bonnisseau; Paris School of Economics, Université Paris 1
  • Tilman Börgers; University of Michigan
  • Peter  Bossaerts; California Institute of Technology
  • Colin  Camerer; California Institute of Technology
  • Timothy  Cason; Purdue Univeristy
  • In-Koo  Cho; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Harold L. Cole; University of Pennsylvania
  • Bernard  Cornet; Paris School of Economics, and University of Kansas
  • Vincent P. Crawford; Oxford University
  • Martin  Cripps; University College London
  • Claude D'Aspremont; Université catholique de Louvain (CORE)
  • Eddie  Dekel; Northwestern University and Tel Aviv University
  • Gabrielle  Demange; Paris School of Economics
  • Egbert  Dierker; Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna
  • Jacques  Dreze; Université catholique de Louvain (CORE)
  • Bhaskar Dutta; University of Warwick
  • Philip  Dybvig; Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ezra  Einy; Ben-Gurion University
  • Larry  Epstein; Boston University
  • Igor Evstigneev; University of Manchester
  • Ernst Fehr; Universität Zürich
  • Dan Friedman; University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Drew  Fudenberg; Harvard University
  • Douglas  Gale; New York University
  • John Geanakoplos; Yale University
  • Piero  Gottardi; European University Institute
  • Jean-Michel  Grandmont; École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique
  • Joseph Y.  Halpern; Cornell University
  • Alejandro  Hernandez; Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México
  • Carlos  Hervés-Beloso; Universidade de Vigo
  • Werner  Hildenbrand; Universität Bonn
  • Charles A.  Holt; University of Virginia
  • Hugo  Hopenhayn; University of California, Los Angeles
  • Tatsuro  Ichiishi; Ohio State University
  • Matthew O.  Jackson; Stanford University
  • Ian  Jewitt; Oxford University
  • Atsushi Kajii; Kyoto University
  • Ehud Kalai; Northwestern University
  • Michihio  Kandori; University of Tokyo
  • Mamoru  Kaneko; University of Tsukuba
  • Michael  Kearns; University of Pennsylvania
  • Timothy  Kehoe; University of Minnesota
  • Narayana  Kocherlakota; Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
  • Dan  Kovenock; University of Iowa
  • Stefan Krasa; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • David  Kreps; Stanford University
  • Vijay  Krishna; Pennsylvania State University
  • Mordecai Kurz; Stanford University
  • John  Ledyard; California Institute of Technology
  • Ehud Lehrer; Tel-Aviv University
  • Steve  LeRoy; University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Dan  Levin; Ohio State University
  • David Knudsen  Levine; Washington University in St. Louis
  • Barton Lipman; Boston University
  • Robert  Lucas; University of Chicago
  • Mark  Machina; University of California, San Diego
  • Michael  Magill; University of Southern California
  • George J.  Mailath; University of Pennsylvania
  • Mukul  Majumdar; Cornell University
  • Edmond Malinvaud; INSEE, Paris
  • Rody  Manuelli; Washington University in St. Louis
  • Andreu Mas-Colell; Universitat Pompeu Fabra
  • Eric S. Maskin; Princeton University
  • Kiminori  Matsuyama; Northwestern University
  • Steven A. Matthews; University of Pennsylvania
  • Ellen  McGrattan; The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
  • Richard  McLean; Rutgers University
  • Andrew McLennan; University of Queensland
  • Nimrod Megiddo; IBM Almaden Research Center
  • Paul Milgrom; Stanford University
  • Paulo Klinger  Monteiro; Foundation Getulio Vargas, Rio de Janeiro
  • John  Moore; University of Edinburgh
  • Hervé Moulin; Rice University
  • John Nachbar; Washington University in St. Louis
  • John  Nash; Princeton University
  • Noam Nisan; The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  • Lee E. Ohanian; University of California, Los Angeles
  • Martin J. Osborne; University of Toronto
  • Thomas Palfrey; California Institute of Technology
  • Christos Papadimitriou; University of California, Berkeley
  • Mario  Pascoa; Universidade Nova de Lisboa
  • Hans Peters; Maastricht University
  • Michele  Piccione; London School of Economics
  • Charles  Plott; California Institute of Technology
  • Konrad  Podczeck; University of Vienna
  • Ben  Polak; Yale University
  • Herakles Polemarchakis; University of Warwick
  • Edward  Prescott; Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Arizona State University
  • Martine  Quinzii; University of California, Davis
  • Roy  Radner; New York University
  • Debraj Ray; New York University
  • Jennifer Reinganum; Vanderbilt University
  • Rafael  Repullo; Centro de Estudios Monetarios y Financieros (CEMFI), Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)
  • Klaus  Ritzberger; Institut für Höhere Studien
  • Donald John Roberts; Stanford University
  • Arthur Robson; Simon Fraser University
  • Jean-Charles  Rochet; Universität Zürich
  • Richard  Rogerson; Princeton University
  • Stephen Ross; Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ariel  Rubinstein; Tel Aviv University, New York University
  • Aldo Rustichini; University of Minnesota
  • Donald  Saari; University of California, Irvine
  • Hamid  Sabourian; Cambridge University
  • Manuel  Santos; University of Miami School of Business
  • Herbert  Scarf; Yale University
  • David  Schmeidler; Ohio State University, Tel-Aviv University
  • Andrew Schotter; New York University
  • Uzi  Segal; Boston College
  • Reinhard  Selten; Universität Bonn
  • Lloyd Shapley; University of California, Los Angeles
  • Karl  Shell; Cornell University
  • Martin Shubik; Yale University
  • Paolo  Siconolfi; Columbia University
  • Steve Smale; University of California, Berkeley
  • Lones  Smith; University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Vernon Smith; Chapman University
  • Joel Sobel; University of California, San Diego
  • Hugo  Sonnenschein; University of Chicago
  • Yves Sprumont; Université de Montréal
  • Dale O. Stahl; The University of Texas at Austin
  • Nancy  Stokey; University of Chicago
  • Yeneng  Sun; National University of Singapore
  • Jeroen  Swinkels; Northwestern University
  • Moshe Tennenholtz; Technion–Israel Institute of Technology
  • William  Thomson; University of Rochester
  • Jean  Tirole; Toulouse School of Economics
  • Walter Trockel; Universität Bielefeld
  • Fernando Vega-Redondo; European University Institute
  • Anne P.  Villamil; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and University of Manchester
  • Rakesh V.  Vohra; Northwestern University
  • Timothy  von Zandt; INSEAD
  • Robert  Wilson; Stanford University
  • Eyal Winter; The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  • Myrna Wooders; Vanderbilt University
  • Randall  Wright; University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Nicholas C.  Yannelis; University of Manchester and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Peyton Young; Oxford University, Brookings Institution
  • William R. Zame; University of California, Los Angeles
  • Shmuel Zamir; The Hebrew University of Jerusalem